Where should I start with a 10-year-old interested in coding?

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Where should I start with a 10-year-old interested in coding?

  • Profile photo of Reagan Rothbard
    Reagan Rothbard

    My nephew is showing great interest in programming and coding. Any thoughts about where he should start and how to get him going?

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    Steven Ng

    I’d suggest looking into the Ruby Language. One of my former clients, Ron Evans, developed a great platform to learn to code called KidsRuby.

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      Reagan Rothbard

      That’s great – thanks Steven. Another friend suggested trying a programmable Lego robot. Anyone ever tried one of these?

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    Roger Browne

    I started my 10-year-old on “Scratch“, a free visual programming language which is lots of fun and powerful too.

    I think the programmable robot would be fun for a while, but it’s quite expensive and might be appreciated more when your nephew is a couple of years older.

    As for Ruby, it’s a well-designed language, and so is Python.

    I also know parents who have skipped the whole “installed languages” thing and just show their kids how to code interactive web pages using HTML and JavaScript. There are plenty of software tools to assist with this, but I don’t know of any that are targeted to 10-year-olds, so parental help would probably be needed to get started.

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    Gregory Ramsey

    Lots of free games to reinforce computer science concepts and programming: https://www.techsupportalert.com/content/best-free-ways-learn-programming.htm

    I also reccomend codeacademy.com (free), codeschool.com has some free theme based courses.

    Khanacademy.com has some free computer science courses and progamming stuff.

    Stuff I’m into is Javascript, Python, SQL

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      Kolomona

      Thanks Gregory, I spent most of today playing around with neural networks from the link that you posted!

      http://www.biologic.com.au/bugbrain/home.htm

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    Ed ODonnell

    I started programming in GW-BASIC when I was five years old. After that I moved on to QuickBASIC, Visual Basic, Java, and C. I would probably start with Python for a beginning programmer today. It is very simple and easy to learn like BASIC.

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    Reagan Rothbard

    Thanks for all the great advice!

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    Properal

    I am going to second @Roger Browne ‘s recommendation on Scratch. You can find free video tutorials online, it is fun, and has a big kid friendly community online. My kids love scratch.

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    Tom

    The Udacity “Introduction to Programming” Nano-Degree is good for beginners.

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    Marlayna Donnelly

    Both my 8 and 10 year old enjoy Scratch as well.  The tutorials are very helpful.

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    Shell Presto DiBaggio

    Even as an adult, I find the online game Code Combat pretty fun and helpful. It’s a pretty fun place to start, and helps reinforce the care with which you need to code. There are quite a few levels for free to see if they like it before you need to commit any money:

    https://codecombat.com/

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    Liz Jaluague

    He might also appreciate a starter arduino and/or raspberry pi kit. It only needs a few lines of code to function, and it comes with an instruction manual, so he’d be able to connect code to function in the real world in a fun and easy way!

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    Thor Kummer

    The JavaScript console in Chrome or Firefox could be a low ceremony intro and also demonstrates the ubiqiousness of programming.

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    Pangur Bán

    I have my 10 year old learning coding at Khan Academy It starts off with the basics, they have tutorials and projects to do and you can also modify other peoples programs. She loves it.

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    Dawn Hoff

    We tried building minecraft code with our 9 yo, but the amount of code needed to do anything bores him (the amount of writing takes him a long time). Scratch is fun and code.org also has little introductions to coding, a lot like scratch. Personally I think Khan starts on a too high

    level – at least for my 9 yo.

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    Reagan Rothbard

    Thanks for the great ideas – I think Scratch is a good choice!

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    Fidelius Kazam

    it is a little off-topic, but my son started out at about the same age with less technical tools like sketchup (a free 3d modeling tool) that gave him some very useful skills later on.  When he got to High School he entered an engineering program and naturally took to autodesk and moved into java programming, video editing and web development.  Find something fun and interesting that can inspire future exploration.

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    punkbass

    I’ve been starting to compile links to these resources. Here’s what I have so far: https://code4liberty.wordpress.com/learn-code

    Anyone

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      punkbass

      If you have any ideas to add let me know

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      Reagan Rothbard

      This is a great list – thanks for sharing!

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    Martin Brock

    I would also start with html and javascript for browser programming. It’s a valuable skill in its own right, and the results can be immediately visible on the web, so he can easily show his product to his friends.

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